Cascadia
bioregion not nation; bioregionalism not nationalism

 

A bioregion is not the same as an ethno-linguistic nation. Modern nations are often defined by commonality of language, ethnicity, shared iconography, sometimes religion and historical experiences. And historically nationalism is the exclusion from all diversity in favour of a specific language, ethnicity, race or religion in association with ethnicity as well as the solidification of gender roles into simplistic terms. Ultimately nationalism pushes for monolithic thought in culture, art, lifestyle and anything else that nationalists claim as inherently theirs. In essence nationalism is the freedom from thinking as individuals in favour of the collective blandness of the same. Bioregionalism is the exact opposite of nationalism. Where as nationalism is the effort to impose singularity in the wide spectrum of the anthrodiversity (human variety in all aspects of being from genetics to culture) and even biodiversity within ecosystems, bioregionalism is the celebration of uniqueness and diversity. Bioregionalism is the recognization of the interconnectedness and the uniqueness of our being within the dynamic network of the myriad of communities. For a bioregionalist, monolithic thought or blandness of being that nationalists purpose or imagine as idyllic is infact tragic at the very least and dangerously foolish at most. For it is out of diversity in thought and being that has repeatedly given birth to innovations and survival.